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SHOW HISTORY

DOING IT RIGHT SINCE 1950

The Plaskolite success story spans six decades. See how it all began.

1951

Plastic drinking straws gave us our first taste of success.

1952

Plaskolite introduces the "lifetime fly swatter," the must-have accessory for every front porch.

1954

As fluorescent lighting fixtures become popular, Plaskolite begins extruding prismatic patterned lenses.

1960

Remember the hula hoop craze? Plaskolite manufactured hula hoops in the early sixties.

1970

Plaskolite begins producing smooth acrylic sheets for storm doors and windows; it's much safer than plate glass.

1974

Plaskolite builds its first polymer plant, enabling us to produce our own pellets for sheet production.

1994

With the purchase of MIR-ACRYL, Plaskolite begins producing mirrored acrylic sheet; security mirrors; and hard-coated acrylic sheet products.

1996

Plaskolite acquires Continental Acrylics, a specialty polymers business.

1997

The acquisition of RAM PRODUCTS' flat sheet business enables Plaskolite to begin production of 19 acrylic mirror colors.

2000

In August, Plaskolite completes construction on a state-of-the-art 245,000 sq. ft. manufacturing facility in Zanesville, Ohio.

2006

Plaskolite acquired Bunker Plastics, a leading manufacturer of polycarbonate mirror; formed security and transportation mirror; and performance enhancement plastic coatings.

2007

Plaskolite acquires the continuously processed acrylic sheet division of Lucite International, including manufacturing plants in Olive Branch, Miss., and Monterrey, Mexico.

2012

Plaskolite acquires the North American VIVAK® line of PETG sheet from Bayer MaterialScience LLC.

2014

Plaskolite acquires the mirror sheet product line
from SPECCHIDEA s.r.l. of Torino, Italy.

Finishing

Common finishing methods can be used on Plaskolite acrylic sheet to achieve matte and lustrous edges, from sanding and scraping to buffing and flame polishing. Our fabrication guide can teach you how.

Scraping

Figure 10

Scrapers are sharp tool steel devises used to eliminate machining marks and ease sharp edges (See Fig. 10).

Sanding

All methods of sanding will result in the removal of machining marks, and produce a matte finish. The choice of hand, palm, random orbit, disc, belt, or drum sanding, depends on the quantity, size and shape of the acrylic sheet. Like sanding wood, work from coarse to fine paper. Use light pressure, and keep the part or sander moving to avoid heat build up (See Fig. 11). After sanding, the edge is ready for buffing or flame polishing.

Flame Polishing

Figure 11

A hydrogen-oxygen torch, with a #4 or #5 tip, gently melts the sanded or machined edges of Plaskolite acrylic sheet, providing a smooth glossy look. Low line pressures create a torch flame that is 2-3” long, bluish, nearly invisible, and narrow enough to prevent overshooting onto the face of the acrylic sheet (See Fig. 12).

Remove the masking from the acrylic sheet, and guide the torch along the edge at a rate of approximately 3-4” per second. As with other cutting and machining processes, avoid excessive heat build up. Bubbles, stress, and crazing will occur if the flame is moved too slowly. Do not cement a flame polished edge.

Buffing

Figure 12

A well machined edge is required to polish without additional sanding. Preferably, use stationary machines with polishing wheels dedicated to buffing acrylic. Wheels 8-14” diameter, 2-3” wide, of bleached muslin with bias strips, run cooler than ones fully stitched. With light pressure, keep the Plaskolite acrylic sheet moving across the wheel to prevent excess heat build up (See Fig. 13).

Figure 13

Finish quality depends on the polishing compounds used. A medium cutting compound will result in a good finish in one operation. A high luster finish can be achieved by first applying a fast cutting compound, to remove machining and sanding marks, followed by a fine compound on a finishing wheel.

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